Tag Archives: scarf

Pattern: Two-tone scarf

Scarf in gray and tan

Scarf in gray and tan

Well, this post has been a long time coming. I finished making the scarf in early November, and finished writing up the pattern the next day. I wanted to make just a quick editing pass before posting, but then life intervened in a major way. More than two months later, I am finally getting my life back to normal; one upside of the long delay is that I’ve started in on another scarf in the same pattern, meaning that for once I have actually tested the write-up before posting.

This pattern is based roughly on this crochet feathers-and-fan pattern, but with some modifications to a) use two colors and b) work better with the silky yarn I had, which just doesn’t want to be bunched up into 5 stitches in one. Other yarns will work fine, but the pattern is optimized for silky-look yarns with a heavy drape.

Detail of scarf showing scale

Detail of scarf showing scale

You will need: two colors of DK-weight, silky-look yarn, such as Paton’s silk bamboo, roughly 200 yards each, and a G-size crochet hook; or whatever yarn you want and its recommended size of crochet hook. Designate one of the colors yarn A and the other yarn B; it does not matter which is which.

Difficulty: you only need ch, dc, and slip stitch (US terminology throughout) for this pattern, but it’s a little complicated so you should be really comfortable working flat in crochet before attempting.

There is a repeat unit which I will reference throughout the steps below:

  1. Starting from the middle of the scarf, crochet outwards as follows: dc in the dc that is two before the first ch1 space (this is equivalent to skip 1, dc in next dc, for the most part). Skipping one dc, dc in the next ch1 space. Skipping one dc, (dc, ch1, dc, ch2, dc, ch1, dc) in the next ch2 space. Skipping one dc, dc in the next ch1 space. (Skip 1, dc in next dc) three times. Skipping one dc, dc in next ch1 space. Skipping one dc, (dc, ch1, 2dc) in the top of the turning ch3 at the end of the row.
  2. Ch3, turn, and (dc, ch1, dc) in the very first dc (the one that is usually skipped in working flat). Skipping one dc, dc in next ch1 space. (Skip 1, dc in next dc) three times. Skipping one dc, dc in next ch1 space. Skipping one dc, (dc, ch1, dc, ch2, dc, ch1, dc) in next ch2 space. Skipping one dc, dc in next ch1 space. Skip 1, dc in next dc. See pattern below for how to finish the row, depending on where in the colorwork you are.

Main pattern:

  1. Me wearing the gray&tan scarf

    Me wearing the gray&tan scarf

    In yarn A, chain 23. Turning, dc in the 6th chain from the hook. Skip 1, dc in next chain. Skip 1, (dc, chain 1, dc) in next chain; chain 2; (dc, chain 1, dc) in next chain. (Skip 1, dc in next chain) five times. Skip 1, (dc, chain 1, 2dc) in next chain.

  2. Still in yarn A, chain 3, turn, and come back as in the second half of the repeat unit: (dc, ch1, dc) in first dc; skipping 1 dc, dc in next ch1 space; (skip 1, dc in next dc) 3 times; skipping 1 dc, dc in next ch1 space; skipping 1 dc, (dc, ch1, dc, ch2, dc, ch1, dc) in next ch2 space; skipping 1 dc, dc in next ch1 space. Skip 1, dc in next dc. Finish the row by dc in the top of the turning ch3.
  3. Set aside the first piece for the moment and pick up yarn B.
  4. Chain 19. Taking the first piece, slip stitch into each of the last four starting chains you made in step 1, from the fourth-to-last to the last one made. See photos below for illustration.
  5. Turn. Skipping one chain, dc in next chain. Continue symmetric to the other part: skip 1, dc in next chain. Skip 1, (dc, chain 1, dc) in next chain; chain 2; (dc, chain 1, dc) in next chain. (Skip 1, dc in next chain) five times. Skip 1, (dc, chain 1, 2dc) in next chain.
  6. In yarn B, complete the second half of the repeat unit. Finish the row by a slip stitch in the yarn-A dc at the end of the yarn-A second row, which should be the dc closest to you at this point. You should now have two symmetric, two-row, wavy bars, one in yarn A and one in yarn B, attached by some slip stitches along the short ends of the bar, with both yarns emerging from the middle of the top of the piece. Note: the next steps are easier if, when you make the slip stitch connecting the two parts, the loop of the inactive yarn is on the side of the work facing you and the tail of the inactive yarn is on the far side of the work.
  7. Still in yarn B, chain 3, and without turning, work the repeat unit on top of the yarn-A section you’ve already made. Finish with a dc in the top of the non-turning ch3.
  8. In yarn A, slip stitch in the three chains of yarn B close to you. Turn and complete the repeat unit. Finish by slipping into the last yarn-B dc.
  9. Still in yarn A, chain 3, and without turning, work the repeat unit on top of the last yarn-B section. Finish with a dc in the top of the non-turning ch3. Chain 3, turn, and complete another repeat section, creating a double-wide bar of yarn A. Finish with a dc in the top of the turning ch3.
  10. In yarn B, slip stitch in the three chains of yarn A close to you. Turn and complete the repeat unit.
  11. Slip stitch into each of the three chains in the turning ch3 of yarn A made in the middle of the previous step. Turn and complete the repeat unit. Finish by slipping into the last dc of yarn A. You should now have two short bars and one long bar of each color.
  12. Still in yarn B, ch3 and without turning complete a repeat unit. Finish with a dc in the non-turning ch3.
  13. In yarn A, slip stitch in yarn-B ch3, turn and complete a repeat unit. Finish with a slip stitch.
  14. Still in yarn A, ch3 and without turning complete a repeat unit. Finish with a dc in the non-turning ch3.
  15. Repeat steps 8-14 but with opposite yarns.
  16. Repeat steps 8-15 until you reach the desired length. End with slip 3, turn and make a repeat unit, finish with a slip stitch in whichever yarn is needed to square off the end. It’s most symmetric if you finish on two short bars, but do what pleases you.
  17. Tie off and weave in ends.

I mentioned I’d started in on a second copy of this scarf. I’m using the weird yarn I mentioned in my last post; it’s a good bit heavier than the Paton’s, I am using a J hook, and it’s not what I’d call silky. Still, it’s working just fine, making quite a bulky/lofty fabric that will be nice if I can finish the scarf before the cold weather departs. Too bad I have more WIPs at the moment than I really know what to do with. At any rate, I bring this up because I took a couple photos of the tricky beginning bit that I didn’t think to get the first time around:

Journal: 7 November 2014

Today I should start with a bit of housekeeping—well, it’s pretty much the focal point of my life at the moment, but housekeeping to the blog: after more than a year of un/under-employment, I’ve accepted a full-time job offer. I’m super excited about it; the work is in my field, at the level I have trained to, the company is generous and the people seem kind. I’m a little less excited about relocating and all the logistical hassles involved, but such is life. The upshot for the blog is that for the next month or so my crafting and posting are going to take a hit, after which I should stabilize but at reduced levels. Wish me luck!

I'm told this is very disconcerting to see not attached to me

I’m told this is very disconcerting to see not attached to me

Also unrelated to crafting, but it amuses me: for various reasons I decided it was high time to reduce the length of my hair. I’ve mentioned incidentally here that it was quite long, at least when I was talking about making scrunchies; last night I got the flatmate to chop off well over a foot, which I plan to package and send off to an ACS-approved charity. I can no longer make a bun, or make more than a stitch or two of braid, but man do I feel free. Anyway, photo at right is the disconcerting disembodied ponytail waiting to be packaged up.

deliveryIn more crafting-related news, but still on the logistical side of things, I took delivery of a whole bunch of yarn and thread the other day. I’ve got a whole bunch of new tatting thread in many colors, the yarn to finish my gray&tan scarf, and some lace-weight merino for when I finish my current two fiddly lace-weight projects.

scarfThe gray&tan scarf is proceeding apace—it’s a good travel project, so I’ve kind of been saving it for all the flying I’ve got coming up, but I couldn’t resist working on it a bit as soon as the delivery came. I’m pleased with the yarn—I got the new stuff from a different store, and got the old almond-color skein long enough ago that matching dye lots would be hopeless anyway, but both colors match well enough that I can’t find the join just by looking at the scarf. So, good enough for me.

The Great Five Blouse Project is also making progress, albeit slowly. If I’m good I’ll get the buttonholes done before my sewing machine gets packed up to move, and if I get that done I can probably finish the shirt for my first week of work, but I’m going to forgive myself if neither happens.

So much yarn, you guys.

So much yarn, you guys.

Finally, the current project I’m most excited about is a new knit-lace scarf in one of the yarns I got for my last birthday. I was a little unprepared for just how much yarn came in this hank: it’s really, really fine yarn so a perfectly normal-looking, normal-heft hank comes in at nearly 1500 yards of yarn. I found this out the hard way when I was trying to ball it up, spent an hour or so winding the yarn and still was nowhere near done. So my yarn is half-balled, half still in the hank which I re-tied and -twisted, and I am getting good use out of my little crafting basket to keep everything together.

Scarf in progress, staked out to simulate blocking

Scarf in progress, staked out to simulate blocking

The pattern comes from the “eyelet diamonds 1” stitch pattern on knitting fool; many thanks to andresue’s blog for introducing me to that website. I’ve modified the pattern a bit, done four repeats width-wise and added a garter stitch border. I’m really happy with how it’s coming along, although it is such fine yarn that it’s going to take a long long time to get a respectable length scarf out of it.

I’ve named it the Pharaohs scarf on ravelry, and will probably publish a quick pattern under that name, because the triangular bits between the yarnovers look like faces and the straight stockinette bits look like either the beard or a headdress thing, at least to me (and I’m told, “can’t unsee it”). The flatmate calls it the spaceship pattern because of how the yarnover holes line up. Here’s some more photos of the project and of a test swatch in the remnants of some sock yarn; you decide:

I learned a couple of new things about knit-lace work during the inception of this project. First is yet another reason to always, always, always make a test swatch before starting the main project: in complicated lace patterns, you really want to make all your haven’t-learned-the-pattern-yet errors in a little bitty thing that you can rip out without too much remorse, not in the real project. I was really good with this project and even blocked my swatch, although since I used a different yarn and needles it won’t give me gauge: the pattern is in sections of stockinette and reverse-stockinette, so I wanted to see how it looked blocked flat instead of all bent at the boundaries between the two. The other thing I learned is that you can get a sense of how the project will look blocked before it even comes off the needles by staking it out, dry, with pins. Having done a bit of proper blocking before gave me a sense of how much I should stretch it in this process. This is how I got the reasonable photo above, even though unstaked it’s all crinkly and bumpy.

Journal: 15 October 2014

The back of my couch is starting to accumulate blankets...

The back of my couch is starting to accumulate blankets…

The main thing I’ve accomplished since my last post is to finish my quiltlet, about which I am very happy and proud, but I think I covered it pretty thoroughly in my pattern post, so today I’m going to talk about what else I’ve been up to.

Christmas-mix yarn dyed with Rit tangerine

Christmas-mix yarn dyed with Rit tangerine

I conducted a new yarn-dyeing experiment, using the same yarn as before but with proper, commercial made-for-cotton dye (Rit brand powder dye). I’m much happier with the results, which is not too surprising. I think I was successful in turning a Christmas mix yarn into more of a harvest colors mix. I was hoping the green would turn more brown and the red would get a bit darker/deeper, but overall I’m pretty happy. I brought the finished item to my local knitting/crochet group the other day, and nobody commented on the yarn or speculated it used to be Christmas colors, so although I can still see it I consider that a success.

basket

Simple basket in dyed yarn

I started pretty much immediately to turn the yarn into another little basket for holding works in progress; this one has a smaller footprint than the other and correspondingly (same total yardage) taller sides. I chained 28, worked back and forth in single crochet until I had a good shape of rectangle (23 rows), then started spiraling around the entire base to make the sides, putting a decrease at each corner of every second row for the first ten rows or so, and then working even until I ran out of yarn. Photos:

Mitts almost finished - I plan to stop close to the elbow

Mitts almost finished – I plan to stop close to the elbow

As you may be able to tell from the above photos, I’ve also been chugging along on my Tunisian honeycomb mitts, which are now probably 80% done. I love how the honeycomb stitch looks, but unlike TSS I can’t just sit down and crank it out forever; my wrists get tired, so these are going a little slower. Still happy with how they are turning out, and because of the thick, cushy back of Tunisian crochet, I expect to be very happy with them come colder months. The pattern is also working out very simple; I’ll post it when the mitts are done.

Neutral-color scarf

Neutral-color scarf

Detail of pattern

Detail of pattern

In order to have something to do that wasn’t honeycomb stitch and didn’t require the sewing machine, I started another new crochet project. I’ve had this one single ball of yarn, worsted-weight bamboo-silk blend in a light tan color, sitting around for literally years; I got it because I ran out in the middle of another project, but couldn’t find the right dye lot and it was noticeably off. Anyway, I picked up another skein of the same yarn, but in a grey/silver color, when I was at the store for dye and quilt batting, and have been working them together into a fairly plain neutral-color scarf. The pattern owes inspiration to this one, but is different enough that I plan on posting it once I finish the scarf, especially since the colorwork is entirely my own invention.

Blue fabric

Blue fabric

Finally, I want to mention a new project added to my queue: I picked up some absolutely lovely blue cotton fabric at the store, because even if my list includes bits and bobs for three or four very distinct projects, I can’t leave without an impulse buy or two. The plan is for this to be a knee-length, A-line skirt suitable for professional wear. The tape is for scale: the medallion designs are fairly large, so this would not be suitable for a shirt, but I think will do well in a skirt.