Tag Archives: ruffle chain

Pattern: Ornate bracelet

Bracelet worked in today's pattern

Bracelet worked in today’s pattern

Wearing my new bracelet

Wearing my new bracelet

The name is a bit of a cop-out, but I’m pretty proud of today’s pattern. I had a pretty big pattern-design first with this one: it started as a doodle and some speculative stitch counts, as a lot of my patterns do, but this is the first one that, when I sat down with needle and thread, actually worked as intended without any adjustment to the stitch counts I’d guessed. On top of that I think it looks rather pretty.

I’ve been making a bunch of bracelets lately, and it’s occurred to me that in addition to the stuff in the tutorial on making bracelet clasps, plus a suitable pattern, a fair bit of trial-and-error work goes into placing the clasp in the pattern so it doesn’t jut off at a funny angle or leave hanging picots. I may post some notes about how to place the clasp in various of my old patterns at some point in the future, but I’ve been pretty busy lately. At any rate, going forward I’m going to include that information in new pattern posts, starting with this one.

My bracelet clasp has also evolved a little bit, so I’ll give instructions with the new one, but the other one works fine too (and inserts the same way into the pattern). Instead of forming the elongated ring for the clasp using spirals, I’ve been using four-four ruffles, which come out pretty straight. The main reason to prefer this is aesthetic; it also makes thread management a little easier. I’ve also been making the clasp ring a little shorter, which makes it harder to take off/put on but correspondingly easier to not lose.

This pattern is a little bit fiddly, fair warning: lots of ruffles and spirals and similar shenanigans. If you haven’t made others of my patterns before, I recommend reading this one before continuing. Pattern:

  1. Ring: 4ds, picot A, 2ds, picot B, 2ds.
  2. Chain: 1ds, 4 single stitches of the same type, spiraling halfway around the needle, 1ds.
  3. Ring (bracelet clasp): 6ds, (2 first-half single stitches, 4 second-half, 2 first-half) three times, 12ds, (2 second-half single stitches, 4 first-half, 2 second-half) three times, 6ds.
  4. [Starting pattern repeat] Chain: Leave a picot-sized space on the ball thread, making picot C between this chain and the previous chain; 1ds, 4 single stitches of the same type, 1ds, join A of previous motif (omit this the on the first repeat); (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches) 6 times to make a ruffle chain.
  5. Shoelace trick: tie a single knot between the needle and ball threads, reversing their positions.
  6. Ring: 4ds, picot A, 2ds, picot B, 2ds.
  7. Chain: 1ds, 4 single stitches of the same type, spiraling halfway around the needle, 1ds.
  8. Ring: 8ds, join C, 4ds, join B of previous motif, 4ds.
  9. Repeat from step 4 to step 8 until piece has reached the desired length. Omit picot A of the last iteration of step 6, otherwise it’ll dangle. Finish on step 8.
  10. Repeat step 4, but add 4ds to the end and do not shoelace afterwards; go directly into a repeat of the ring in step 8. There should be no hanging picots and both threads should be at the center of the end of the piece, right where you want them.
  11. Shoelace trick and chain 4ds.
  12. Knot the two threads securely together and wrap a bead for the other half of the clasp as described in the tutorial here, starting on step 5.
ornate_working

Test pieces in original scale and scaled up.

This pattern also, somewhat to my amazement, scales up well—in #10 thread and my idiom, it’s about 7/8″ wide as written, but if you scale up by 3/2 it still works, making a more open look and a width of 9/8″ or so. So the repeat unit becomes, in condensed notation, chain 2 spiral 2 join, (2-2 ruffle x9); shoelace; ring 6 picot 3 picot 3; chain 2 spiral 2; ring 12 join 6 join 6. Note that a spiral is 4 single stitches, so it’s (more or less) equivalent to 2ds. The photo at right has the piece I made to test the pattern I’d doodled and a larger-scale version.

Obviously this pattern also works for general edgings and strips and all; just omit the clasps.

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Pattern: Fans edging

Fans edging

Fans edging; ignore the sad ring on the far right, as I was still working on it

In my last post I mentioned I’d made two new patterns, but then didn’t mention what the second (actually the first I made) one was. There’s a very simple explanation for that: I am terrible at naming things, and I like this pattern enough that I really wanted to find it a good name before posting. After dithering for a few days, I gave up. The upshot is, I am quite proud of this pattern and hope you like it.

When I was working on the water drop edgings, it occurred to me that the cartoony “water droplet” shape is also the basic element in paisley designs, of which I am rather fond. So, this was my first attempt at making a paisley tatting pattern. I think I rather failed in that regard—paisleys are generally not so linear or so dense—but I like the result anyway.

Pattern:

  1. Ring 20ds, join to B of previous motif, 2ds, 4 second-half single stitches, 6ds.
  2. Ring 10ds, join to B of previous motif (2 joins in same picot), 10ds, picot A, 2ds, 4 second-half single stitches, 6ds.
  3. Ring 10ds, join A, 10ds, picot B, 2ds, 4 second-half single stitches, 6ds.
  4. Ruffle chain: (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches) 15 times.

fans_down

 

Notes on the water droplet rings: the second-half single stitches should cause the thread to spiral halfway around the needle (or base thread or whatever it’s called in shuttle tatting), not be held to one side like in a Josephine knot. If you make your rings like I do, that is with the needle thread, this spiral actually makes the rings close more neatly than ordinary rings, which is why I specify you need second-half single stitches rather than first half. If you have no idea what I’m on about, go read my original water droplet edgings post too.

Notes on ruffle chains: this isn’t strictly necessary for this pattern if you keep your chains fairly loose; I use ruffle chains to reduce the natural curvature of my chains, which I pull quite tight. I also rather like the effect. See also here.

Quick pattern: Braid edging

braid_banner

Simple, narrow edging that looks a bit like it’s braided

Today’s pattern is a quick and easy one; it’s quite similar to the first edging I ever attempted in tatting, although I think the added shoelace trick and second point of attachment improves it.

I also added a ruffle chain section, which I think improves it a tiny bit, but is totally optional.

Pattern:

  1. Ring 15ds, picot A, 3ds. small picot B; 12ds or (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches) x6 to make a ruffle section.
  2. Chain 3ds, join A of previous motif, 18ds.
  3. Pass needle through small picot B (or make whatever wrong-side join you like) and shoelace trick.
  4. Repeat from step 1.

I think the smaller you can make picot B while still being able to make the join (which for needle tatting just means you need to get the needle through it), the better, but it’s not tremendously important.

braid_1

Pattern: Floral edging

flower_edging

Five-petal flowers connected by a ruffled chain

Today’s pattern is one I’ve been trying to get right for a while; I’m still not confident I’m there, but I’m happy enough to share it. It comes with not one but two new techniques, which I may be re-inventing but I’ve not seen on the tatting internet before. If such things scare you, be assured that they are pretty optional; I’ll include instructions to sub in more tried-and-true techniques.

New technique number one I am calling a reversed join, because that’s what it is. It is a picot-less joining technique, meaning you can join the ring (rings only, and only the way I make rings, unless you have spare needles) you’re currently making to any point on the established piece, without needing to plan ahead and put a picot there. I came up with it when doing a lot of design, when I wanted that flexibility, but another advantage is you can make much tighter joins than I know how to make with ordinary picot/joins, which is why I use it in this pattern.

Steps for the reversed join:

  1. Omit the picot that the pattern wants you to join to, but keep track of where it would be. Use safety pins as markers if you like.
  2. Just before starting the ring with the join in it, poke the needle through the knot where the picot would be and pull the thread partway through. This is similar to setting up for beaded picots, but instead of a bead you’re using the tatting you’ve done so far.
  3. Make the first part of the ring, up to where it says to join, in the needle thread between the threaded-on join and the rest of the work.
  4. Slide the join up to the knots on the needle.
  5. Make a picot of whatever size you like with the join on it; for this pattern, just pull the thread tight.
  6. Finish the ring as normal.

New technique number two I am calling a ruffle chain, and it is a successor of the spiral chains I’ve been talking about lately. It’s not essential to this pattern—replace with a spiral chain if the idea frightens you. I think they look neat, though, and will probably be using them more in future. The idea is that, if a normal chain has a fairly severe natural curve to it, and a spiral chain is straight, what if you make a chain that’s somewhere in between ds and spirals? Specifically, what if you spiraled part-way around and then came back? The ruffle chain is just that: make two or three or four single stitches of the same type in a row, then make the same number of single stitches of the other type to come back. Two-stitch ruffle chains (that’s two first-half single stitches, two second-half single stitches, two first-half, etc) and three-stitch ruffle chains have intermediate curvatures, and four-stitch ruffle chains are very nearly straight by nature. And, instead of a straight row of knot tops or a spiral staircase, the knot side of ruffle chains zigzags in what I find a pleasing way. Your mileage, of course, may vary. To put the curvature and knots in the right place, it helps to start and finish with fewer single stitches than your main repeat, so a four-stitch ruffle starts with two single stitches, etc.

flower_edging_2Without further ado, the pattern:

  1. Ring 4ds; if you don’t like the idea of reversed joins, ring 2ds, small picot, 2ds instead
  2. Chain 4ds
  3. Ring 3ds, large picot A (1/2″ or so; large enough to make four joins into), 3ds
  4. Chain 6ds, join B of previous flower, 6ds
  5. Ring 3ds, join A, 3ds
  6. Chain 12ds
  7. Ring 3ds, join A, 3ds
  8. Chain 12ds
  9. Ring 3ds, join A, 3ds
  10. Chain 6ds, picot B, 6ds
  11. Ring 3ds, join A, 3ds
  12. Chain 4ds
  13. Ring with reverse join: insert needle into the ring you made in step 1 between the second and third ds, pull through some thread; 2ds, slide join up to knots, pull working thread fairly tight and make 2ds with no picot. If you don’t like reverse joins, instead just ring 2ds, join to the ring made in step 1, 2ds.
  14. Ruffle chain: 2 first-half single stitches; (4 second-half single stitches, 4 first-half single stitches) three times, 2 second-half single stitches. If you don’t like ruffle chains, feel free to either: spiral chain 32 or so single stitches, or shoelace trick, chain about 30ds, shoelace trick.