Tag Archives: bracelet

Pattern: Flowering vines bracelet

Four pieces in the flowering vines pattern, mostly bracelets

Four pieces in the flowering vines pattern, mostly bracelets

Today’s pattern is a tatted strip that looks best done in different colors (one for the ball and the other for the needle thread). It’s quite a narrow strip, works well as a bracelet, and would work well as a simple edging if you neglect the bracelet clasp bits of the pattern. It’s a simpler descendant of this pattern which I was surprised I hadn’t thought to try sooner.

Wearing the yellow-flowers bracelet, to give you a sense of how narrow it is

Wearing the yellow-flowers bracelet, to give you a sense of how narrow it is

To work in two colors, knot the ends of two threads together when you start the work and bury the ends in the first ring or chain as you would when joining in new thread. Start the first few knots of the pattern right up against the color change knot, in this case on the needle thread side. I like the pattern with green for the “vines” and a variegated thread for the “flowers” (although the yellow also works quite well), but your mileage may vary.

To start the bracelet:

  1. Ring 6ds, picot A, 6ds
  2. Chain 3ds
  3. Working as for a chain, in the ball thread: 6ds, (2 first-half single stitches, 4 second-half single stitches, 2 first-half single stitches)x3, 12ds, (2 second-half single stitches, 4 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches)x3, 6ds. Start pulling the core thread through, but pass the needle through the closing loop to form a self-closing mock ring. I found it works best to pass the needle through the loop two or three times in the same direction to make a longer connection.
  4. Chain 5ds, (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches)x3
  5. Shoelace knot
Close-up of the stitches

Close-up of the stitches

Repeat unit (start after step 5 above, repeat 1-3 as many times as you like or until bracelet is about 1/2″ shorter than you want it:

  1. Ring 6ds, picot A, 6ds
  2. Chain 4ds, join A of previous repeat, 2ds, (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches)x3
  3. Shoelace knot

Finishing the bracelet:

  1. Ring 8ds, small picot, 4ds
  2. Chain 4ds, join A of previous repeat, 2ds, (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches)x3
  3. Pass the needle through the small picot and tie a shoelace knot
  4. Chain 4ds
  5. Tie both threads together and wrap a pony bead in the needle thread as in this tutorial
  6. Tie threads together again, pass both through the center of the wrapped bead, and clip ends

vines_1Obviously, if you just want an edging, ignore the first and most of the last section (steps 1-3 are a decent way to end an edging section, but you don’t need the bead). If you want a tasseled bookmark, ignore the first section and instead of making the wrapped bead make a tassel in step 5-6 of the last section.

The yellow piece shown is my working-out-the-pattern piece and does not have a bracelet clasp. The piece with blue “flowers” is scaled up, replacing every three stitches with four (except in the bracelet clasp, which is the same size).

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Pattern: Ornate bracelet

Bracelet worked in today's pattern

Bracelet worked in today’s pattern

Wearing my new bracelet

Wearing my new bracelet

The name is a bit of a cop-out, but I’m pretty proud of today’s pattern. I had a pretty big pattern-design first with this one: it started as a doodle and some speculative stitch counts, as a lot of my patterns do, but this is the first one that, when I sat down with needle and thread, actually worked as intended without any adjustment to the stitch counts I’d guessed. On top of that I think it looks rather pretty.

I’ve been making a bunch of bracelets lately, and it’s occurred to me that in addition to the stuff in the tutorial on making bracelet clasps, plus a suitable pattern, a fair bit of trial-and-error work goes into placing the clasp in the pattern so it doesn’t jut off at a funny angle or leave hanging picots. I may post some notes about how to place the clasp in various of my old patterns at some point in the future, but I’ve been pretty busy lately. At any rate, going forward I’m going to include that information in new pattern posts, starting with this one.

My bracelet clasp has also evolved a little bit, so I’ll give instructions with the new one, but the other one works fine too (and inserts the same way into the pattern). Instead of forming the elongated ring for the clasp using spirals, I’ve been using four-four ruffles, which come out pretty straight. The main reason to prefer this is aesthetic; it also makes thread management a little easier. I’ve also been making the clasp ring a little shorter, which makes it harder to take off/put on but correspondingly easier to not lose.

This pattern is a little bit fiddly, fair warning: lots of ruffles and spirals and similar shenanigans. If you haven’t made others of my patterns before, I recommend reading this one before continuing. Pattern:

  1. Ring: 4ds, picot A, 2ds, picot B, 2ds.
  2. Chain: 1ds, 4 single stitches of the same type, spiraling halfway around the needle, 1ds.
  3. Ring (bracelet clasp): 6ds, (2 first-half single stitches, 4 second-half, 2 first-half) three times, 12ds, (2 second-half single stitches, 4 first-half, 2 second-half) three times, 6ds.
  4. [Starting pattern repeat] Chain: Leave a picot-sized space on the ball thread, making picot C between this chain and the previous chain; 1ds, 4 single stitches of the same type, 1ds, join A of previous motif (omit this the on the first repeat); (2 first-half single stitches, 2 second-half single stitches) 6 times to make a ruffle chain.
  5. Shoelace trick: tie a single knot between the needle and ball threads, reversing their positions.
  6. Ring: 4ds, picot A, 2ds, picot B, 2ds.
  7. Chain: 1ds, 4 single stitches of the same type, spiraling halfway around the needle, 1ds.
  8. Ring: 8ds, join C, 4ds, join B of previous motif, 4ds.
  9. Repeat from step 4 to step 8 until piece has reached the desired length. Omit picot A of the last iteration of step 6, otherwise it’ll dangle. Finish on step 8.
  10. Repeat step 4, but add 4ds to the end and do not shoelace afterwards; go directly into a repeat of the ring in step 8. There should be no hanging picots and both threads should be at the center of the end of the piece, right where you want them.
  11. Shoelace trick and chain 4ds.
  12. Knot the two threads securely together and wrap a bead for the other half of the clasp as described in the tutorial here, starting on step 5.
ornate_working

Test pieces in original scale and scaled up.

This pattern also, somewhat to my amazement, scales up well—in #10 thread and my idiom, it’s about 7/8″ wide as written, but if you scale up by 3/2 it still works, making a more open look and a width of 9/8″ or so. So the repeat unit becomes, in condensed notation, chain 2 spiral 2 join, (2-2 ruffle x9); shoelace; ring 6 picot 3 picot 3; chain 2 spiral 2; ring 12 join 6 join 6. Note that a spiral is 4 single stitches, so it’s (more or less) equivalent to 2ds. The photo at right has the piece I made to test the pattern I’d doodled and a larger-scale version.

Obviously this pattern also works for general edgings and strips and all; just omit the clasps.

Tutorial: Tatted bracelet clasp

Two tatted bracelets with a wrapped pony bead clasp

Two tatted bracelets with a wrapped pony bead clasp

I put up a lot of lace edging patterns here, but I know not a lot of y’all have the interest in garment sewing that I do, so making edgings is less appealing.  However, strips of lace have other uses: you can make a headband, a necklace, or a bracelet, to name three. For my choker pattern, I used ordinary brass findings from the beading section of my local craft store, but it’s always nice to have other options, and in the interim I thought of a way to do integrated clasps without having to worry about matching colors or styles between the findings and the thread. Today I’m going to show you how, as well as show off a couple bracelets I made recently.

In addition to your normal tatting supplies, you will need a single large, large-bore bead. Anything labeled a pony bead should do, and most things labeled barrel beads should do as well. If you somehow don’t have any of these on hand—I was a craftsy kid in the 90s so I have a whole box of them, sorted by color, cluttering up my craft space—you can get them by the hundreds for a couple bucks. It’s a good idea to choose one roughly the same color as your thread, if possible, but you’re going to be wrapping it completely so it doesn’t matter too much. Note: this tutorial, along with all my tatting stuff, comes from a place of needle tatting, but if you’re a shuttle tatter you can play along too—you’ll need a tapestry needle, doll needle, or similar for covering the bead, anything you can get your tatting thread through the eye of, and which isn’t much larger in diameter than the thread—no yarn needles.

First, choose a tatting pattern. Anything I’ve posted tagged “flat edging” will do well, although be aware of how wide it’ll be when you choose. So far I’ve used my crowns edging and my garden path edging. You’ll need to decide where in the pattern you want to break to insert the clasp. For the crowns edging, I started at step 7 and finished at step 3, and for the garden path, started at step 1 and ended at 8. You want the insertion point to be somewhere that a ring or chain made from that point will extend along the length of the piece, rather than off to the side, and ideally be somewhat centered.

Note: This clasp pattern is worked out for #10 thread and your standard plastic pony bead; if you are using different materials, I recommend practicing wrapping a bead first, then making sure the ring in step 1 below will go around it before putting in all the work on the bracelet. For smaller threads, add groups of 8 single stitches (one full spiral) to both sides of the first ring. See also my dragonfly pattern for another use of this ring shape.

Steps:

  1. Ring 6ds, 32 first-half single stitches spiraling four times around the needle, 12ds, 32 second-half single stitches spiraling four times around the needle the other way, 6ds. Depending on the pattern, you may want to add picots to either or both 6ds section to secure it to the rest of the pattern. Both of my bracelets start this ring with 3ds, picot, 3ds.
  2. Make lace according to your pattern, starting at your start point, until you have roughly 8″ (or desired length) from tip to tip and you are at an end point in your pattern.
  3. If necessary, add a short length of chain or spiral chain to separate the bead from the last ring of the pattern by at least an eighth-inch or so.
  4. prepTie a square knot between your needle and ball thread.
  5. You will need roughly a yard of thread on your needle. If your current needle thread is shorter than that, cut the ball thread a yard from the piece and thread that. Shuttle folks: cut a yard of thread, attached to the piece, from either your ball or shuttle, and thread that onto a tapestry or doll needle.
  6. Thread the bead onto the thread.
  7. secure_beadTie a single overhand knot between the needle thread and the thread under the bead, then pass the needle through the bead, from bottom to top (in the same direction as before) to put the knot inside the bead. There should be one loop of thread wrapping over the outside of the bead. See photo.
  8. Slide the bead down to the end of the tatting piece and pull the knot tight to secure it into place.
  9. three_wrapsBegin wrapping the thread around the bead: always pass the needle through the bead from bottom to top, and make sure each wrap lies straight next to its neighbors, not crossing or tangling. Keep the thread pulled tight as you work. The inside of the bore is smaller than the outside you have to cover, so the thread will bunch up on the inside and try to form gaps on the outside; just cover the gaps as necessary.
  10. When you’ve gotten about halfway around the bead, wrap the thread down around the outside, then pass the needle straight across the bottom of the bead, passing through the square knot if you can, wrap the thread around the outside from bottom to top, and start wrapping from the opposite side, passing the needle through the bead from top to bottom. This just makes the final tie-off easier.
  11. fully_wrappedFinish up by wrapping over any gaps you see, pulling the thread tight as you do. When you can’t see the bead any more, not even by wiggling the thread around with your fingertips, you’re done. It should be getting a little full in the center of the bead, but still easy to get the needle through.
  12. Tie a knot between the thread you’ve been working with and the other one coming off the tatted piece. I like holding both ends together and tyingfinished a single overhand knot in both.
  13. Cut both threads to a few inches length, if necessary, and thread them both onto the needle together. Pass them through the bead, from bottom to top, and tug to get the knot up inside the bead. Trim close to the top of the bead.
  14. The clasp works by pushing the wrapped bead through the elongated ring made in step 1; the elongated shape helps prevent the bead from coming out on its own, much like a slit buttonhole.

Photos: